For the Love of Mountains: A Photo Odyssey

Yosemite National Park, California

We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh-and-bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun,—a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal. ~John Muir

Yosemite’s High Country

I’ve been thinking a lot about mountains.  It’s been too long since I last visited some of the ranges I’m especially fond of.  With their lovely snow caps, exquisite waterfalls, clear-running streams, crystal alpine lakes, rugged terrain, variety of trees & wildlife, and incredible vistas, what’s not to miss?  John Muir, the Scottish-American who dedicated the latter part of his life to exploring the mountains of the Western US, was also enamored of them.  It is said that Muir exemplified our oneness with the earth, and biographer Donald Worster wrote that Muir believed his mission was saving the American soul from total surrender to materialism.” 

Alpine lake in Great Basin National Park, Nevada

You must ascend a mountain to learn your relation to matter, and so to your own body, for it is at home there. ~Henry David Thoreau

Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

I suppose my love of mountains was forged at an early age. As a child, I lived in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains, and my family would sometimes drive north to see the more majestic areas of the range.  You might imagine how, years later, my infatuation grew as I began exploring areas with higher and higher elevations.

Rocky Mountain stream, Colorado

Every inch of the mountains is scarred by unimaginable convulsions, yet the new day is purple with the bloom of youth and love. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

Sequoia National Park, California

I have visited a lot of little mountain towns in this country.  Oftentimes, I hear that the indigenous people of the area consider their mountains sacred and go to great measures to protect them.  That’s not hard for me to understand, as mountains evoke a sense of reverent connection within me.  I believe that’s what Muir must have experienced, as well.  He wrote letters, articles, & books, and shared conversations with scientists, artists, celebrities, and statesmen in his preservation efforts.  Perhaps the pinnacle of his life’s work was co-founding the Sierra Club, thereby helping establish a number of National Parks in this country, which serve to protect his beloved peaks.

King’s Canyon National Park, California

The mountains are calling and I must go.  ~John Muir

King’s Canyon

I am grateful for the hard work and dedication of John Muir. Thanks to him, much of the mountains of the American West can still be enjoyed in their pristine glory. And if we’re really lucky, that will never change.

Grand Tetons, Wyoming

Oh, these vast, calm, measureless mountain days, days in whose light everything seems equally divine, opening a thousand windows to show us God. ~John Muir

Grand Teton National Park

Blessings for Mountain Love,

Lisa

This was one of my most popular posts of 2020. Thank you for reading! I won’t be available for comments this week, but let’s catch up next week!

The content of this article is for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice. Please consult with a qualified health care professional before acting on any information presented herein. Any statements about the possible health benefits of any subject discussed have not been evaluated by medical professionals or the Food & Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease or illness.

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